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Return of the Wolf 狼回來了

In one of the six vignettes that make up the 2015 dystopian film Ten Years, government officials stage a fake assassination to justify tighter state control. It all works according to plan, and the story ends with an ominous news broadcast: “This incident provides ample proof to the central government that foreign powers have infiltrated our city and that a national security law can no longer be delayed.” 
The short film paints a frightening future of Hong Kong, but its story line is nothing new. Manufacturing a crisis to legitimatize a political agenda is not only an old trick in the communist party’s playbook, it is also a tactic frequently and increasingly used by the ruling elite in Hong Kong.

And nobody does it better than C.Y. Leung—former chief executive and now vice chairman of the influential National Committee of the People's Political Consultative Conference (政協). 

Hardly anyone batted an eyelid when the Foreign Correspondents’ Club first invited Andy Chan Ho-tin (陳浩天)…
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Here Cometh the Thought Police 思想警察來了

The notion that national security will one day be invoked to silence dissent comes at no surprise to hardened Hong Kongers. Commentators, academics and filmmakers have long prophesied that doomsday scenario. The writing has been on the wall for years, and the arrival of an anti-subversion law is a matter of when, not if. 
We just didn’t think it would happen so soon, at least not before the return of Article 23 that the city has fought so hard to keep at bay. 
But that day is now upon us. 

On Tuesday, the Security Bureau unceremoniously handed Andy Chan Ho-tin (陳浩天), convener of the pro-independence Hong Kong National Party (香港民族黨), a demand for HKNP to justify its existence or be banned in three weeks. 
Attached to that ultimatum were hundred of pages of police evidence detailing the many ways HKNP has “recruited members”, “conducted propaganda” and “infiltrated schools”—allegations that are more often associated with a Beijing operative. 
The Hong Kong government’s unprecedented mo…

Who is Au Nok-hin? 誰是區諾軒?

Five weeks ago, I sat down with Demosistio’s Agnes Chow (周庭) at a Causeway Bay café to talk about her bid to fill the seat vacated by disqualified lawmakerNathan Law. Shortly thereafter, Chow herself was barred from running on the grounds that her political party had advocated “self-determination”, a stance that election officials deemed tantamount to pro-independence and therefore noncompliant with nomination requirements.

Chow’s disqualification has prompted Au Nok-hin (區諾軒), a Southern District Councillor and former Democratic Party member, to throw his name in the hat for the vacant Hong Kong Island seat. Nicknamed “agnès b” for running as Chow’s Plan B, Au has been pulling out all the stops to make up for lost time. But even with the full backing of the pan-democratic camp, the late starter must quickly close the gap in both name recognition and campaign funding.
It was déjà vu all over again when I met Au at the same coffee shop in Causeway Bay to discuss his campaign and poli…

From Street to Chic, Hong Kong’s many-colored food scene 由大排檔到高檔: 香港的多元飲食文化

Known around the world as a foodie’s paradise, Hong Kong has a bounty of restaurants to satisfy every craving. Whether you are hungry for a lobster roll, Tandoori chicken or Spanish tapas, the Fragrant Harbour is certain to spoil you for choice.
The numbers are staggering. Openrice, the city’s leading food directory, has more than 25,000 listings—that’s one eatery for every 300 people and one of the highest restaurants-per-capita in the world. The number of Michelin-starred restaurants reached a high of 64 in 2015, a remarkable feat for a city that’s only a little over half the size of London. Amber and Otto e Mezzo occupied two of the five top spots in Asia according to The World’s Best Restaurants, serving up exquisite French and Italian fares that tantalise even the pickiest of taste buds.

While world class international cuisine is there for the taking, it is the local food scene in Hong Kong that steals the hearts of residents and visitors alike. Whatever your budget and palate…

Who is Agnes Chow? 誰是周庭?

It was roughly six months ago when Nathan Law, chairman of Demosisto, lost his job. He and five other pro-democracy lawmakers had strayed from the prescribed oath during the swearing-in ceremony, and were ousted from the Legislative Council (LegCo) after Beijing issued a reinterpretation of the oath-taking provisions in the Basic Law. Many saw the unseating of six democratically-elected lawmakers, dubbed “Oathgate” in the local press, as a calculated political move to purge the legislature of the opposition.

The time to fill some of these vacated seats is finally upon us. Four by-elections will be held simultaneously on March 11, in Hong Kong Island, Kowloon West, New Territories East and for the Architectural, Surveying, Planning and Landscape sector.
Barely old enough to run, 21-year-old Agnes Chow (周庭) of pro-democracy party Demosisto has thrown her hat into the ring hoping to win back Law’s Hong Kong Island seat. Her decision to run has not come without a price: she has deferred …

Book Review: "Generation HK" 書評:《香港世代》

Unpacking the young generation in Hong Kong is a tall order, not least because a singular, archetypical “Hong Kong youth” does not exist. The cohort is as diverse and divergent as it comes, from socioeconomic background and upbringing to education and exposure to the wider world, to values, ideals and aspirations. It defies stereotypes and generalisations.

Ben Bland, a British correspondent for The Financial Times, is in a unique position to take on that ambitious project. Whereas Bland’s extensive experience reporting in Asia—including stints in Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam and Myanmar—has given him a broad field of view, his relatively short tenure in Hong Kong—just over two years—allows him to look at its people through a long-range lens.
It is that unadulterated objectivity and his unquenched curiosity that make Generation HK: Seeking Identity in China’s Shadow a discerning and refreshing read. Released last summer under Penguin Book’s inaugural “Hong Kong series” to mark the 20…

Past Events: 2017年活動

Media coverage and speaking engagements in 2017


Interview with Apple Daily 蘋果日報
Title: "下月8日提訊 料親身上庭 [Patrick Ho] to be arraigned on 8 January, expected to appear in person"
Publication date: 22 December

Interview with Ming Pao Daily 明報
Title: "依法限提訊後70日開審 律師指變數仍多 [Patrick Ho to be tried within 70 days of indictment, but timing is subject to change" Publication date: 21 December

Interview with Ming Pao Daily 明報 Title: "何志平案1月8日提訊 或3月中開審 料獄中過農曆年 Patrick Ho to be arraigned on 8 January pending trial in March, expected to spend Chinese New Year in prison" Publication date: 21 December

Interview with Apple Daily 蘋果日報 Title: "起訴書:何志平倘罪成須充公財產 Indictment says Patrick Ho's assets to be seized upon conviction" Publication date: 20 December
Radio Interview with BBC Radio Title: "Censorship and freedom of expression in China and Hong Kong" Show: The Cultural Frontline Presenter: Tina Daheley Broadcast date: 11 December
Moderator at Enrich HK panel …